July 1, 2013: Japanese Knotweed Management Summit to be held August 5th

Japanese knotweed is an invasive plant that spreads rampantly along roadsides and river banks and is a nuisance to landowners. Dense infestations clog drainages, obstruct driver visibility and push out native plants, degrading fish and wildlife habitat.

Japanese knotweed is an invasive plant that spreads rampantly along roadsides and river banks and is a nuisance to landowners. Dense infestations clog drainages, obstruct driver visibility and push out native plants, degrading fish and wildlife habitat.

KEENE VALLEY, NY Registration is open for the Japanese Knotweed Management Summit: Taking Action in the Adirondacks, a “how-to” workshop for land managers, transportation professionals and community leaders. The free event will take place at the Tannery Pond Community Center in North Creek from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Monday, August 5th. Join experts from across the region and take action to combat the spread of this troublesome invasive plant.

The Summit will feature presentations on the distribution of Japanese knotweed and status of management efforts in the region, planning considerations, control options, permitting, case studies from public and private lands, community-based control programs, prevention measures and more. An on-site demonstration of management techniques will also be offered.

Land managers, transportation professionals, community leaders, industry professionals, state and local government staff, not-for-profit organizations and landowners are all encouraged to attend. Certified applicators will be eligible to receive five herbicide recertification credits each in Categories 2, 3a, 6a, 9 and 10. 

There is no registration fee to attend, but participants are asked to RSVP by Monday, July 22nd so that organizers can plan accordingly for seating, supporting materials and refreshments. Please RSVP to Allie Smith by calling 518-668-5773 or emailing [email protected] with “JK Summit” in the subject heading of your email and include the number of participants attending, names, contact information and whether you are interested in receiving recertification credits.

“Japanese knotweed is one of the most detrimental and difficult to control invasive plants in New York, and it is spreading in the Adirondack region. Now is the time to take coordinated prevention and management action,” said Hilary Smith, director of the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program (APIPP). Knotweed invades river and stream banks, affecting native plants, fish and wildlife. Dense infestations clog drainage ditches and obscure visibility along roadways. Unwanted populations are also nuisances to landowners.

Japanese knotweed spreads by aggressive root growth and by small fragments that quickly establish thick stands. Improper management can make infestations worse. “Knotweed is a serious problem outside of the region. When I saw it starting to spread in Inlet and other Adirondack communities, I knew something had to be done. I reached out to the Town, volunteers and partners, like APIPP, to help treat infestations,” said Doug Johnson, who spearheads the volunteer-based Regional Inlet Invasive Plant Program (RIIPP).

The Summit is designed to provide a forum for sharing current information on best prevention and management practices and to inspire coordinated local action to stop the spread of Japanese knotweed. Organizers include the Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program, Regional Inlet Invasive Plant Program and Lake Champlain Lake George Regional Planning Board. The Adirondack Watershed Institute generously will sponsor lunch. More information about the Summit, including a preliminary program, is online here.